Housing Advice

Do you need housing advice? the following information may be useful

NHA can provide free and confidential housing advice to you. We provide this service on behalf of Newcastle Borough Council.

Helping us deal with your initial inquiry

Please bring with you any documents that you have relating to your housing issue. For example:

•A notice to quit, or notice seeking possession if you have been given one by your landlord;
•copy of letter from mortgage lender, solicitor or court if you are a home owner and your property is being repossessed;
•possession order or bailiff’s warrant if you have one;
•any letter from relatives or friends stating you must leave;

Please also bring any Home Office documentation you have about your asylum/immigration status if this applies to you;

I have a home but it isn't satisfactory

I want to end my tenancy

It is possible to get out of the agreement at any time if you can come to a mutual agreement with your landlord. This is called ‘surrender’. To be valid, both sides must agree, and it is always best to put what has been agreed in writing so everyone knows where they stand. If you have a joint tenancy all the joint tenants and the landlord must agree to the surrender. It is worth seeing if your landlord is willing to negotiate even if your tenancy agreement says you cannot leave early. It may be convenient for both of you!


Ending a tenancy agreement early

If the agreement is periodic (rolling from week to week or month to month), a tenant will normally have to give at least four weeks’ notice to end it, or a calendar month if it is a monthly tenancy. The notice must be in writing and must end on the first or last day of the tenancy, unless the tenancy agreement allows it to be ended on a different day. If rent is paid less frequently a tenant has to give at least one rental period of notice. So if rent is paid every two months, two months notice would be required. A tenant may choose to end a periodic tenancy be issuing a valid notice to quit to the landlord. Once the notice expires then the tenant’s agreement will have ended.


Ending a periodic tenancy agreement

If the agreement is periodic (rolling from week to week or month to month), a tenant will normally have to give at least four weeks’ notice to end it, or a calendar month if it is a monthly tenancy. The notice must be in writing and must end on the first or last day of the tenancy, unless the tenancy agreement allows it to be ended on a different day. If rent is paid less frequently a tenant has to give at least one rental period of notice. So if rent is paid every two months, two months notice would be required. A tenant may choose to end a periodic tenancy be issuing a valid notice to quit to the landlord. Once the notice expires then the tenant’s agreement will have ended.


I want to just walk away
Walking away or just posting the keys through the letterbox is called ‘abandonment’ and will not end your tenancy. Your agreement with the landlord will continue even though you have left and the landlord can continue to charge you rent, so you are likely to build up rent arrears until possession is granted. This may also make it harder for you to find a new home, as most housing associations and private landlords ask new tenants for references from previous landlords and are not keen to rent to anyone who has abandoned a tenancy. Similarly, it is important to make sure that you have somewhere to go when you leave. If you need to make a homeless application in the future, or after you have walked away from the tenancy, Newcastle Housing Advice may decide that you are intentionally homeless. This is because you left a home that you could have stayed in, but you chose to leave. It is always best to seek advice before you make any decisions.

Can I get someone else to move in?
This may be possible if you have no choice but to leave early and want to avoid paying rent on more than one home. However, you have to get the landlord’s agreement for the person you suggest to move into the property. The landlord may want to take up references for them. The landlord should give the new person their own tenancy or licence agreement – otherwise, you will still be legally responsible for the tenancy

What happens when my agreement runs out?
If your agreement is for a fixed term (eg six months) you can leave on the last day of the fixed term without giving notice. You must ensure that you do not stay even one day over, or you will automatically become a periodic tenant and will have to give proper notice or come to an agreement with your landlord. If you intend to leave on the last day you are not legally required to give the landlord any notice, but it is usually a good idea to do so, to avoid any dispute about when you actually left. Good communication helps things to go smoothly. Remember that you may need a reference to get a new home and, if you have paid a deposit, you are more likely to get it back if you keep the landlord in formed. If you stay beyond the fixed term and your landlord does not give you a new fixed term agreement, your tenancy or licence will automatically become periodic, which means that it rolls from week to week or month to month.

What if my landlord agrees that I can leave?
It is possible to get out of the agreement at any time if you can come to a mutual agreement with your landlord. This is called ‘surrender’. To be valid, both sides must agree, and it is always best to put what has been agreed in writing so everyone knows where they stand. If you have a joint tenancy all the joint tenants and the landlord must agree to the surrender. It is worth seeing if your landlord is willing to negotiate even if your tenancy agreement says you cannot leave early. It may be convenient for both of you!

My landlord wants me to leave
A ‘Section 21 Notice to Quit’, so called because it operates under section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, is the notice a landlord can give to a tenant to regain possession of a property at the end of an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST). The landlord is able to issue the tenant with a section 21 notice without giving any reason for ending the tenancy agreement. A landlord has the legal right to retain possession at the end of a tenancy but must follow the correct legal procedure, which includes serving a section 21 notice. The Housing Act 1996 amended the section 21 of the 1988 Act by requiring this notice to be given in writing.-

What if the tenants just leave?
Walking away or posting the keys through the letterbox is called ‘abandonment’ and will not end a tenancy agreement. The agreement will continue even though the tenants have left and the landlord has the right to continue to charge rent. A landlord can apply for a court order to make tenants pay what is owed. It should be noted that if the property has since been let out rent can only be claimed for the period of time before a new tenant has moved in. The period of time that rent can be charged after a tenant leaves depends on the type of agreement. In a fixed term agreement rent can continue to be charged up until when the term ends. If the agreement is periodic, rent can be charged up until the time when the agreement would have ended had the tenant given the agreed period of notice.

What if you have a joint tenancy or licence?
You have a joint tenancy or licence if you share with a spouse, partner, family member or friend and both/all of your names are on the agreement. The actions of each individual person will affect all of your rights. For instance:
•If one of you leaves without ending the tenancy correctly, the whole rent will still be due and the other(s) will have to pay the missing person’s share.
•If one of you has caused damage, the landlord may be entitled to take money out of your shared deposit.

What other options are there?
If the landlord will not allow you to leave early and will not allow a new tenant suggested by you to move in, you may be able to negotiate to only pay part of the rent you owe. For example, if there are four months left on a fixed term agreement, the landlord might agree to only two months’ rent instead while they look for a new tenant.

When can a Section 21 notice to quit be issued?
A section 21 notice can be issued at any time during the fixed tenancy or during the periodic tenancy, but a Section 21 notice to quit can only be used to regain possession of a property at the end of an assured shorthold tenancy. If a landlord wishes to regain possession before the end of the agreed term, this may be possible if he can show certain conditions have been met. In order to do this he must first issue the tenant with a valid section 8 notice to quit. Section 21 notices served during the fixed term of the tenancy Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 as amended by the Housing Act 1996 requires that the landlord provides tenants of an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) with a minimum of two months’ notice in writing, stating that possession of the property is sought. The two months starts when the tenant receives the notice not when the notice was written/posted. A Section 21 notice must be served before possession order will be issued by a court. Possession under this section of the Housing Act 1988 cannot take place during the fixed term of the tenancy, but the notice can be served at any time during the fixed term provided the tenant is given a minimum of two months’ notice. The tenant is not required to give up possession of a property until a minimum of two months after the Section 21 notice to quit was served. This includes Section 21 notices served up until the last day of the fixed term. We recommend that if you are served with any type of notice from your landlord to contact us and seek advice immediately.

I have a home but need to leave

I cannot stay in my home?

We can refer you to a place of safety, such as a refuge. Refuges are safe houses run for women suffering domestic violence. Refuges provide somewhere safe for you to stay. Staff at refuges specialise in dealing with domestic violence, and so can give a lot of emotional and practical support. We will always try to get you into a refuge as locally as possible, however due to the nature of this type of accommodation, this is not always possible.


Victim of domestic violence and want to stay in your own home

We can refer you to the police domestic violence unit, to report the crime and they can also help and advise you with injunctions against your partner. We can also help to refer you to local agencies that will be able to offer you advice and support.


What is classed as abuse?

Physical attacks are the most obvious sign of domestic abuse. They do not need to leave visible marks to be damaging. Sexual abuse can include rape or forced participation in sexual acts you are uncomfortable with. Mental or emotional abusive acts attack your personality and emotional and well-being rather than your body. Mental abuse is not as obvious as physical abuse, but it can be just as harmful.

Financial abuse is where one partner controls all of the finance, often depriving the other partner of their financial independence or security. An example of this is where one partner does not give the other enough money to meet everyone’s needs in the household.

Newcastle Housing Advice works on a culture of belief. Your concerns will be believed and everything you share with us is done in the strictest of confidence. No actions will be taken without your agreement and permission. Women and men officers are available to conduct interviews, if you have a preference, please let us know.


Domestic Violence
If you are a victim of domestic abuse, considering your housing options is a vital way of getting protection for yourself and your family and moving on with your life. Your safety is an important aspect of the choices you make. Domestic Abuse could be from a partner or family member. Domestic abuse can include acts that, while not physically violent, enable a person to exercise control and power over another. Domestic abuse can be shouting and rows, constantly being insulted or belittled, or being deprived of money. If your partner does anything that frightens or controls you, it could be domestic abuse. Remember also that violence is a criminal offence and against the law.

Relationship breakdown
If you are going through a relationship breakdown, we can help and advise you on the best action to ensure a planned move to a new home. We can also make an appointment for you to speak to a solicitor, if needed for an hour’s free legal advice. Where you hold either a joint mortgage or tenancy we will give you advise on your rights to stay and the best ways to transfer this into your sole name, if applicable. We could also refer you to a local solicitor for an hour’s free legal advice on such issues. Counselling can provide a caring and supportive environment to help you find a way through any difficulties you may be facing. We can refer you to Relate, who are a specialist counselling service to help you resolve your relationship/housing difficulties.

I need to find a home

Leaving home for the first time
Leaving home can give you more freedom, independence and space, but it is not guaranteed to be a positive experience. It is not always easy to find a suitable place and living on your own can be expensive. There are many things to think about such as,
•How will I pay the rent?
•How will I pay bills?
•Can I still afford to eat after the bills are paid?
•How can I afford if I am not working?

Under the government’s benefit rules, a single person under the age of 35 and claiming benefits may only be eligible for a relatively low amount of assistance with their rent, which is approximately £45 per week. Preparing properly makes the process easier and can help to avoid being homeless. Find out about your rights, talk to your family and friends, work out your finances and find a place to live before you leave. Call us on 0345 850 9698, or alternatively access Shelter’s website, or ring them on free phone 0808 8004444 to talk in confidence and receive housing advice.


I am staying with friend, but they have asked me to leave
You will probably have to leave unless the person agrees to let you stay longer. It is usually worth asking if you could stay a little longer while you try to find somewhere else to live. We would usually ask the person evicting you to give you something called “reasonable notice”, which is about 28 days. If you require assistance Newcastle Housing Advice would be happy to contact your friend and discuss the issue if you are worried about asking them yourself.

We are a couple at risk of homelessness
Couples experiencing the breakdown of a relationship can approach organisations such as Relate to help with relationship difficulties. Mediation can produce an amicable arrangement about the family home. Newcastle Housing Advice is able to refer customers to relate to receive their expert help. Please contact us on 0345 850 9698 for more details.

I am a young person and have been asked to leave home, what can I do?
Mediation may help in this situation. Contact Newcastle Housing Advice on 0345 850 9698, particularly if you are under 18. We may be able to get in touch with your parents to arrange a meeting where you can discuss your difficulties and come to a mutually satisfactory solution to enable you to stay or return home.

I need advice

General advice

Private Rented – Can we help? – you may wish to visit our Private rented page
For the up to date information please contact us or visit this government page

Local Housing Allowance rates can be found on the Newcastle under Lyme Borough council website and this will help you decide if the property you have found is affordable. Most private landlords require rent in advance and a deposit. Newcastle Housing Advice can, in certain circumstances provide help with both of these requirements, via the Rent Deposit Scheme. In order to qualify for our help you must be homeless or threatened with homelessness, have a connection to Newcastle Borough and meet certain income requirements. If you wish to discuss this scheme to see if we can help you further, please contact us on 0345 850 9698.


About private tenancies
If you are interested in finding your own rented accommodation and are threatened with homelessness, tell us and we can discuss this with you. The private sector might offer a quicker housing solution, and allow you a greater control in where you want to live, as well as the type of property. A landlord can end a tenancy at the end of the fixed term (usually 6 months, but sometimes more) provided that the tenant has been given two months written notice in the form of a section 21 “notice to quit”. It may be possible for a landlord to end a fixed tenancy early if certain grounds have been met.

I already rent privately
If you already rent privately, we can help and advise you your right to stay in your home depends on the tenancy agreement you have. We need to see the agreement and the notice served before we can advise you correctly. If your landlord did not give you an agreement when you moved in, we can advise on your rights to remain in the property. Since 6 April 2007, when a landlord or letting agent issues a new or renews an assured short hold tenancy where a deposit is involved, such deposit must be protected by a government approved scheme.

What sort of advice is available?
Our free, confidential and impartial advice covers a range of issues:
•help with finding accommodation
•help with housing and welfare benefits
•Help to understand your legal rights.

Local Housing Allowance (LHA) and housing benefit claims
Most people who pay rent can apply for LHA if they are on a low income. Problems with LHA claims may put you in rent arrears and cause problems with your landlord. In these situations, we may be able to help prevent you from losing your home by contacting the council’s LHA team on your behalf and liaising with your landlord. An LHA claim is your responsibility and it is up to you to provide any requested documents to assist the claim.

Money advice

Mortgage/rent arrears, debt issues
If you have problems paying the mortgage, or have debts you find difficult to meet, you may lose your home as a result. We may be able to help you to sort these out and prevent you losing your home. Newcastle Housing Advice has access to specialist debt advisors which we can refer you to. The service can
•check whether you are getting the correct benefits
•draw up a financial statement to see what money is available, if any, to pay creditors
•check liability for debts owed
•advise on what to pay first
•negotiate with creditors
•make applications to various trust funds for additional grants
•signpost to other advice agencies/information sources where necessary

I am in debt, what can I do?
It is really important that you attend a drop in session or make contact with Newcastle Housing Advice on 0345 850 9698


Leaflets and Useful Information

NHA Leaflets

Mental Health

Information and Support agencies available

If you wish to make an application for housing please register an application on Homes direct. – link also to other accommodation options page

The Lyme Trust
The Lyme Trust provides supported accommodation for people living with mental
Health problems. They support people with substance misuse and addiction
Difficulties alongside any mental health issues.
37 London Road
Newcastle under Lyme
Staffordshire
ST5 1LN
Tel: 01782 634510
Fax: 01782 625677
Email: thelymetrust@tiscali.co.uk

North Staffs Mind
Offers counselling and support, and supported housing , free counselling, anger management befriending and parent support for more information please view their information online.
83 Marsh Street North
Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent
ST1 5HN
Tel: 01782 262100
Mind info line 0300 123 3393 (Mon-Fri, 9-6pm)
Legal Advice Line 0300 466 6463 (Mon-Fri, 9-6pm)
www.nsmind.org.uk


Rethink
Rethink offer a tenancy support service which Includes accommodation and Housing
Management support for people affected by mental illness aged 18 years and above, who are at risk of not accessing or Sustaining a home because of their mental health, vulnerability and / or a history of housing related problems.
0121 522 7007
Email: info@rethink.org
www.rethink.org

Access team
North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust – Access Team
Provides mental health assessments, crisis support, telephone contact or face to face advice
Harplands Hospital
Hilton Road
Harpfields
Stoke-on-Trent ST4 6RR
Tel: 0300 123 0907 (Access Team, choose option 1)
Web: www.combined.nhs.uk
Open 24/7

Staffordshire Mental Health telephone support
Tel 0808 800 2234
www.brigherfutures.org.uk


Arch
Includes help for people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.
Helpline 01782 205 500
General enquires 01782 744533
www.archnorthstaffs.org.uk


Brighter futures
Clubhouse network, safe spaces, support for self harm
Tel 01782 406000
www.brigherfutures.co.uk


Changes
Mutual help groups and support
01782 413101
WWW.CHANGES.ORG.UK

Samaritans
ECHO
Support for self harm
Tel 07500 444116
www.brighterfutures.co.uk

Dove Service
Support for suffering from bereavement, life changing illness and significant loss
Tel 01782 683155
www.thedoveservice.org.uk

One recovery
Drug and Alcohol support service
Tel 01782 662 585

Lifeline
Drug and Alcohol service
Tel 01782 283113 Adults
Tel 01782 818570 / 221090 Young People

Leaving Hospital

If you have a local connection to Newcastle under Lyme and are you about to leave or recently left hospital and have not secured accommodation, you can contact us for advice and housing options.

Click Here To Register for housing

Useful links for accommodation and support

Link to the Mental Health options page

Leaving Care

If you are you about to leave or recently left care of a local authority and have not secured accommodation, you can contact us for advice and housing options.

The leaving care team have a legal duty to help you prepare for independent living, their contact details are

Staffordshire Looked after Children Services Team
The Civic Offices
Merrial Street
Newcastle under Lyme
Staffordshire
ST5 2AG

Phone: 01782 296290

E-mail: leaving.care@staffordshire.gov.uk

Emergency duty number: 01785 354030

www.staffordshire.gov.uk/health/childrenandfamilycare/leavingcare/home.aspx

If you wish to apply for accommodation on the Newcastle under Lyme area, you will need to register on Homes Direct.

The Housing Associations we work with do not accept customers for a property until you reach 18.

For information on how the council can offer advice, you can visit the Shelter website

Useful contacts

Anew
Accommodation and support providers for care leavers in Stoke, Staffordshire & Cheshire

Tel: 01782 720094

E-mail: stoke@anewyps.co.uk

Website: www.anewyps.co.uk

Leaving the Armed Forces

If you are you about to leave or recently left the armed forces and served in the last 5 years and wish to live in the Newcastle under Lyme area, please register for accommodation with us on Homes Direct www.homesdirect.co.uk applications are given reasonable preference on the Newcastle Housing Advice Housing Register, for other accommodation options please look at Accommodation options factsheet (or link to sheet)

If you want more information about your housing rights and the council’s duties please visit Shelter’s website

Ex Service Personnel Guide

National Homeless Advice Service Publications

National Information and support services available
Link to the CAB website

The Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association (SSAFA)
Help and advice for those serving in the Armed forces
Telephone: 020 7463 9398
Email: housing@ssafa.org.uk
Website: www.ssafa.org.uk


Joint Service Housing Advice Office (JSHAO)
A Service to provide information and advice for those leaving Armed forces including dependants
Joint Service Housing Advice Office

Floor 1 Zone 1
Montgomery House
Queen’s Avenue
Aldershot
Hampshire
GU11 2JN
Advice line: 01252 787574
Email: AWS-JSHAO-Mailbox@mod.uk
Website: www.gov.uk


SPACES
A service to help find housing for Veterans left the armed forces in the last 6 months
SPACES

Regional Resettlement Centre
St. Aidan’s Road
Catterick Garrison Catterick
North Yorkshire
DL9 3AY
Telephone: 01748 833797 or 01748 872940 or 01748 830191
Fax: 01748 835774
Email: spaces@echg.org.uk
Website: www.spaces.org.uk


Royal British Legion
Advice and information for all veterans
Legionline: 0808 802 8080
Website: www.britishlegion.org.uk


Veterans UK
Free helpline for veterans
Ministry of Defence
Norcross
Thornton Cleveleys
Lancashire
FY5 3WP
Veterans Helpline: 0808 1914218
Bereavement and textphone line: 0800 169 3458
Email: veterans-uk@mod.uk
Website: www.veterans-uk.info
The Sir Oswald Stoll Foundation
Suppport and housing to vulnerable and disabled veterans and their dependants
Sir Oswald Stoll Foundation
446 Fulham Road
London
SW6 1DT
Telephone: 0207 385 2110
Website: www.oswaldstoll.org.uk

Veterans Aid
40 Buckingham Palace Road
Victoria
London
SW1W 0RE
Helpline: 0800 012 68 67
Email: info@veterans-aid.net

Domestic Abuse

If you are a victim of domestic abuse, considering your housing options is a vital way of getting protection for yourself and your family and moving on with your life. Your safety is an important aspect of the choices you make. Domestic Abuse could be from a partner or family member. Domestic abuse can include acts that, while not physically violent, enable a person to exercise control and power over another. Domestic abuse can be shouting and rows, constantly being insulted or belittled, or being deprived of money. If your partner does anything that frightens or controls you, it could be domestic abuse. Remember also that violence is a criminal offence and against the law.

Domestic violence and want to stay in your own home

We can refer you to the police domestic violence unit, to report the crime and they can also help and advise you with injunctions against your partner. We can also help to refer you to local agencies that will be able to offer you advice and support.

What is classed as abuse?

Physical attacks are the most obvious sign of domestic abuse. They do not need to leave visible marks to be damaging. Sexual abuse can include rape or forced participation in sexual acts you are uncomfortable with. Mental or emotional abusive acts attack your personality and emotional and well-being rather than your body. Mental abuse is not as obvious as physical abuse, but it can be just as harmful.

Financial abuse is where one partner controls all of the finance, often depriving the other partner of their financial independence or security. An example of this is where one partner does not give the other enough money to meet everyone’s needs in the household.

Newcastle Housing Advice works on a culture of belief. Your concerns will be believed and everything you share with us is done in the strictest of confidence. No actions will be taken without your agreement and permission unless there is a safeguarding issue. Women and men officers are available to conduct interviews, if you have a preference, please let us know.

Nhas Factsheets


Useful contacts

Helpline numbers:

Arch North Staffs domestic violence helpline 01782 205500 9am – 3pm

Arch North Staffs

24 hour domestic violence helpline 0808 2000 247

Staffordshire Police:
•non-urgent number 101
•In a emergency dial 999

Child line – 0800 11 11

Broken Rainbow (LGBT) – 0845 2604 460

SAVANA sexual violence and rape support service – 01782 433205

Male victims – 01782 683702 (9- 5) or helpline Tuesday 4.30pm-6.30pm

Refuges – a safe place to stay : Elizabeth House, Newcastle – 01782 713737

Potteries Women’s Refuge – 01782 822885

Refuge – 01332 200027 (specifically for Asian women)

Websites and other useful numbers :

Karma Nirvana – 0800 5999 247
‘Honour’ based abuse and forced marriage

Hideout – a website for children and young people

Respect – www.respectphoneline.org.uk

For perpetrators of abuse
National stalking helpline – 0808 802 0300

Women’s Aid


Staying safe
You will already have your own methods of coping but there may be other things you can do to try and keep you and your family safe. Please follow the link below to Arch’s website for more information.

Safety Plan


Staying Put

If you can’t or don’t want to leave your home and are at continued risk of abuse, the helplines can tell you about any local support groups or services. They can also advise on safety planning, eg. You could leave an emergency bag and money with a friend in case you need to flee your home suddenly.

Make your home safer

To improve your safety at home, you could:
•Change the locks, locks on the windows, install an outside light to come on when someone approaches.
•Contact your local council for advice as they might be able to help you.

Get the home in your name

In some situations the courts will transfer the home into your name, even if your partner is currently the sole owner or tenant. This is more likely to be agreed if you have children. A family law solicitor can advise you on this.

Call the Civil Legal Advice helpline on 0345 3454345 to find out if you qualify for legal aid.

Ask for a transfer or exchange

If you are a council or housing association tenant you can apply for a transfer or mutual exchange. Ask your landlord how to register for any schemes they offer. You should ask any one moving in to your home not to disclose where you have gone.

Find Private Rent

Private landlords usually ask for a deposit and rent in advance, as well as a reference. Shelter, local citizen advice or Homes Direct who can advise on you finding a rented home.

Further advice

You can get further advice from Shelter’s free* housing advice helpline 0800 8004444, a local shelter advice service or local Citizens Advice Office, or by visiting the shelter website

*calls are free from uk landlines and main mobile networks


Leaving Custody

If you are you about to leave or recently left custody and have not secured accommodation, you can find information below.
Further information on your housing options available on the following factsheets

Keeping your home

Housing on Release

Housing Options for Offenders

Useful links

Staffordshire and West Midlands Probation Service

NACRO

Rethink
Support for Mental Illness a selection of Factsheets available

Saltbox – Restart

Provides accommodation and support for offenders
01782 815 879
Email: restart@saltbox.org.uk

If you want more information about your housing rights and the council’s duties please visit Shelter’s website

If you wish to apply for housing in Newcastle under Lyme you need to register on Homes direct.

Before your application can be considered for acceptance on the housing waiting list, we will require further details of your conviction history. We only require convictions considered unspent under The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.

You can request this information from Disclosure Scotland, a public body who provides this information and ensures we do not see information we are not entitled to see.
The disclosure we require is the ‘Basic Disclosure’ which contains only convictions considered unspent under The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, if you have no unspent convictions, the report will state this.

Contact Details

Disclosure Scotland, PO Box 250,Glasgow, G51 1YU. Phone: 0870 609 6006

Once you have applied to Disclosure Scotland, you will receive the Certificate, it usually arrives within 14 days. They charge £25.00, and payment can be made on line via their website.

Once we have enough information, we will then consider whether you can be accepted onto the Housing Register or if you are a ‘disqualified person’ and should be excluded from it. We will write to you again to advise you of this decision.

Other Accommodation options you may wish to consider



Homeless Advice

If you we can not prevent you from becoming homeless we may have to take a homeless application from you.

Things to consider

•If you are at risk of losing your home, you must get help immediately. Early action can prevent you becoming homeless
•if you are a tenant, your landlord will normally have to apply to the county court for a possession order before you can be legally evicted
•you must get advice before deciding to leave or sell accommodation you have rights to occupy
•We aim to deal with all applications in a sympathetic and polite way. We will always be fair and your case will be dealt with in the strictest confidence
•in return we ask that you treat our staff in a polite and reasonable manner

Find out more about homelessness here